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VS.NET 2008 IDE Frozen After Compilation

clock January 16, 2008 21:08 by author JKealey

Each and every time I've compiled my solution over the last month, I've had to wait approximately 30 seconds for the IDE to resume after compiling. It simply said Build failed / Build succeeded and would not let me click anywhere in the UI for a painful half-minute (which I put to good use).

At first, I assumed this was another "feature" of VS.NET that was causing me pain and suffering, just like when my VS.NET 2005 decided to make me pay for cheating on it with another IDE (Eclipse) when I was working on a few open source Java projects using Eclipse (StatSVN and jUCMNav).

Evil VS.NET 2005

I decided to launch VS.NET 2008 in Safe Mode to verify if this would fix my problem and, to my surprise, it did. I probably have an evil add-in that was migrated from VS.NET 2005... to be investigated.

Update: Even in safe mode, it started doing it again after a couple hours of work. I'll file this into the "unexplained" category, alongside my mysterious "clipboard doesn't work for large images when memory usage is too high". From what I can see, Windows 32bit with the /PAE or /3GB options simply doesn't work. I need to upgrade to a 64bit OS to use my 4GB ram because the startup options aren't working well for me.



Attach to Process with one shortcut

clock January 11, 2008 11:40 by author EtienneT

In case you didn't know, there is a much faster way to debug an ASP.NET application when running IIS than hitting F5. You can directly attach the debugger to the existing w3wp.exe to quickly start your debug session by doing Debug -> Attach to Process -> w3wp.exe. After a while, you start using the "Attach to Process" command very often in a usual day.  I created a simple visual studio macro to automatically attach to the ASP.NET process when you need to debug a site.  Then you can call the macro with a simple keyboard shortcut.  Here is the code:

Option Strict Off
Option Explicit Off
Imports System
Imports EnvDTE
Imports EnvDTE80
Imports EnvDTE90
Imports System.Diagnostics
Imports System.Security.Principal

Public Module RecordingModule
    Sub AttachToAspNET()
        Try
            Dim dbg2 As EnvDTE80.Debugger2 = DTE.Debugger
            Dim trans As EnvDTE80.Transport = dbg2.Transports.Item("Default")
            Dim compName As String = WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent().Name
            compName = compName.Substring(0, compName.IndexOf("\"))
            Dim proc2 As EnvDTE80.Process2 = dbg2.GetProcesses(trans, compName).Item("w3wp.exe")
            proc2.Attach2(dbgeng)
        Catch ex As System.Exception
            MsgBox(ex.Message)
        End Try
    End Sub
End Module


To create the macro in your Visual Studio, just open the Macro Explorer in Tools->Macro->Macro Explorer, make a new macro and copy paste the code. The only thing you could need to change is "w3wp.exe" or "aspnet_wp.exe" depending on your version. Note that I'm assuming you're working with only one w3wp active at a certain point in time. Those of you who have multiple worker processes running simultaneously should feel free to augment the code for your purposes. (Take a look at this to figure out which w3wp to attach to.)

Creating a keyboard shortcut afterwards is pretty easy:



Go to Tools->Options in Visual Studio.  Then just follow those easy steps:
  1. Click on Environment->Keyboard
  2. Type AttachToAspNET in the "Show commands containing" textbox.
  3. Press a keyboard shortcut you want to use.  I used Ctrl-Alt-K and it is working fine.
  4. Click on Assign


Happy coding in 2008!

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View this post in Russian :)



Debug Visualizer for SubSonic Collections

clock December 7, 2007 20:00 by author EtienneT


Wouldn't it be nice to be able to see a SubSonic collections while you are debugging, just like the DataSet debug visualizer? Because we often need such a tool to debug our SubSonic collections here at LavaBlast, I've created a small Visual Studio Debug Visualizer that you can use to see what your SubSonic collections contain.  How does it work?  While you are debugging, put a breakpoint somewhere and simply hover your mouse over a SubSonic collection variable.  You should see something similar to the screenshot shown above.

Once the tooltip has appeared, you can click on the small magnifier to open the debug visualizer.  You'll see a DataGridView similar to the picture on the right. This will show all your SubSonic objects in a easy to navigate list.  Basically my code takes the SubSonic list and transform it in a DataTable.  I can't use the method ToDataTable() from the SubSonic AbstractList because this requires access to the provider's configuration, and the JIT executing the debug visualizer doesn't have access to it.

To use this simple tool, download this file SubSonicVisualizer.dll (8.00 kb) and put it in your [My Documents]\Visual Studio 2008\Visualizers\ folder, creating the directory if it doesn't already exist. (You might want to double check your file system permissions on this folder, as well.) I compiled this for Visual Studio 2008.  I have also included the source code here (Visual Studio 2008) in case anyone wants to enhance it.

SubSonicVisualizer.zip (386.36 kb)

If you are using Visual Studio 2005, I think this file will work for you, but I have not tested it: SubSonicVisualizer2005.dll (8.00 kb). I simply changed the reference from Microsoft.VisualStudio.DebuggerVisualizers.dll version 9.0 to 8.0 and, from what I have read, it should work in VS.NET 2005.

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Multitasking while Visual Studio builds

clock December 5, 2007 13:25 by author EtienneT

Are you using Visual Studio and your solutions are taking longer than 10s to build? Why not put those 10s to good use and do something other than stare emptily at your poorly decorated office? Maybe you are worried that your build will finish before you expect it to and you don't want to lose precious time? You don't have to worry about this anymore thanks to what I found today! You can now feel free to peruse a few blog posts while Visual Studio is building!  [insert witty comment about how men have difficulty multi-tasking here]. 

Robert Robins posted this on his blog recently and I didn't even know it existed! You can configure VS.NET build sounds that information you where the build is done!

Go to the Control Panel, Sound and Audio Devices, Sounds Tab, Microsoft Visual Studio, and configure the sounds you'd like to play when the build succeeds/fails. LavaBlast is not responsible for what your coworkers do to you after configuring Pee-wee Herman or a bomb siren as your default sounds.

Happy coding!

 

 

 

 

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The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in anyway.

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