Leigh Hilbert Photography captured a Lava Blast! We're six months late to inform people that you can/should still start a software company in a downturn as this has been covered already here, here, here, here, and here.  Why are we six months late informing you of this, you ask? We have been incredibly busy building software for our existing / new customers during this period. For reasons left unexplained, we've seen the number of leads in our sales pipeline increase dramatically since the start of the recession. Furthermore, people have been coming to us for consulting services thanks to the reputation we've built since we launched LavaBlast.

If we had to name a single element that has helped us / will help us during the recession, it would definitely be our capacity to discover commonalities between seemingly different situations, abstracting them out and generalizing the problem. We can build systems for people who may not be in the franchise industry, but have similar needs. This lengthens our runway. This is one of the skills that we learned in university (more on this subject in Part 7).

If you take a deeper look at what LavaBlast does (building customized software that helps collaboratively manage a franchise) it is easy to notice that we're solving a problem in a particular vertical that is present in numerous other business contexts. We build operational line-of-business applications (aka help-me-perform-my-daily-tasks-easily software) that are used by franchise owners and franchisors (aka different-users-can-see-different-parts-of-the-data-while-sharing-some-of-it software). Without going into greater detail, many businesses are looking for software that helps them simplify their day-to-day operations and reduce costs, recession or not. It might not be as scalable as a consumer-focused website and not as glamorous as other projects, but it does have its challenges and is a great type of business that one can bootstrap!

[ We'd like to thank Leigh Hilbert for the "Lava Blast" picture seen above. ]

 

A mix of software products and services

In the Part 1, written last year, we describe how LavaBlast builds products (franchise management solution, franchise point of sale, etc.) but also services (as we adapt our software to each franchise's business processes). To help sustain development in a bootstrapped startup, software consulting is often a necessary “evil”. This year, we did do some consulting but managed to make the best of it. We've made a few interesting realizations that we've shared at a recent TeamCamp event at The Code Factory and would like to re-iterate here. This discussion assumes you're building software for other businesses instead of consumers (for obvious reasons, it is easier to bootstrap a software startup that targets businesses).

Typically, software consulting companies produce the same kind of software a couple times for different clients before deciding that it would be a good idea to build a product that addresses this same problem. At this point, they've delivered source code to each of their customers, as the customers retained the intellectual property rights related to the produced software. Therefore, to build a product and commercialize it, the consultants need to start from scratch. Although this may seem bad as the firm loses time and money rebuilding the product, it typically allows them to “build it right” thanks to the lessons learned during the first iterations. The product's architecture is well implemented as the main variation points have been clearly defined.

Simply put, we did the opposite and have kept the intellectual property rights from day one. (How? We got lucky that our customers had limited funds to invest and knew the value of intellectual property.) We sprinted for over a year building the core of our solution that allows retail stores and e-commerce websites to communicate with a centralized franchise management application. This was a large undertaking, but we had our first customer already using the product and paying for its development, while we kept the rights to the source code. (Note: we still did multiple iterations and learned from our mistakes!) Once completed, the core was easy to adapt to different franchise systems because we're experts at rapid application development and because our core architecture allows us to vary software behaviour for each franchise (thank you the strategy design pattern and dependency injection!).

What's interesting to note here is that because we own the intellectual property for the core of our system, it is much easier to sell enhancements to our core (to new customers) while preserving the rights to the source code for the combined system. It is also easier to find new customers because the core is already built. Simply put, investing a year into a software product is an investment that keeps on giving, even in the services arena. Because we have a flexible core that has already been implemented and we're keeping the IP, it helps us keep costs down during a bad economy. This is a win-win situation for both parties!

Advantages for the software startup

  1. Retain the intellectual property
  2. Build applications faster, giving you time to work on other things
  3. Keep costs down - easier to find clients in bad economic times

Advantages for the client

  1. Lower cost
  2. Put the software to use quickly
  3. Lower project risk

 

To get back to the discussion we had at TeamCamp, the question was how do you turn your service business into a product-based software startup when you have limited/no funds, have limited/no leads, and own limited/no intellectual property? Well, I'm sad to say it, but it “sucks to be you”.

You have to break the perpetual cycle you're currently in and do something different.

For some people, that means realizing that you're never going to make a decent living building static websites for $200 when you've got to spend 20 hours with the customer to figure out where they want the pictures of their puppies on their upcoming site before actually starting the work. Your competition is doing it at half the price with pre-built templates, stock photography and, as an added bonus if you order within the next 24h, offering them a box of branded pens, 500 full-colour business cards and a mention on their next Twitter post. You are a commodity.

For others, the decision boils down to what short term loss can do accept for possible future gains:

  • Build a product, build your reputation, and try to sell enhancements to customers while retaining the IP.
    • Tradeoff: money. You don't earn much revenue while doing this (often nothing during the first months). If you don't have prospects and don't know if your idea is any good, this is risky.
  • Assuming you can't afford this, build something during weekends and evenings and reap the rewards when it is complete.
    • Tradeoff: time. It takes five times as long to build it. However, you aren't screwed if things don't work out because your regular work pays the bills.
  • Build a quick alpha version and see what happens. Spark interest? Find funders? Find partners? Abandon your crazy idea?
    • Tradeoff: features & quality. It is preferable to fail quickly if you are bound to fail. I'd prefer investing a week of my time and getting proper feedback from peers informing me that my product idea sucks and I am bound to fail than eating cheap noodles for six months before discovering than no one will buy my completed product. Talk to people at events like TeamCamp or DemoCamp - stop being scared someone will steal your idea. Don't ask Mom or your beer buddies as they won't be harsh enough on you (although some of them might be mean drunks!).

One tip that we do want to give fellow bootstrappers out there is that, in the early days, you can give the customer a non-restrictive copy of the code, while retaining ownership for yourself. That way, both parties have a copy of the source code and both parties can do whatever they want with it, including selling it to others. However, you're the developer and the customer has better things to do than commercialize your software: all they care about is being able to maintain the code when your contract with them is over. This is a win-win situation for both parties, especially when you've managed to collect various modules that you can re-use for different customers.

How to launch a software startup in a recession

(Precondition: Start something that you can sell to businesses to lower the risk. )

  1. Find a first potential customer. Sign contract that says the intellectual property is yours but they get a copy of their version and they can do anything with it.
    • At this point, your software is worth nothing more than what the first customer is willing to pay for it.
  2. Take your core software and refine it with other customers.
    • This time, try to keep the source code to yourself, as it is starting to build value.
  3. Repeat step 2 until you've got enough funds and a high quality product.
    • Your product is now valuable. You are now out of the perpetual cycle.
  4. Sell copies and grow your business
    • This is where LavaBlast is at now, after two years.
  5. [insert secret sauce here]
  6. Success!

 

Conclusion

Considering all that has been said about launching a software startup in a recession, I think it all boils down to asking yourself "is this the right time for me?". Software startups / Micro-ISVs are tiny in comparison to what's going on at the macroeconomic level. Before taking the risk to launch your own business, what matters is the presence of the following elements:

  • Dedication / Passion / Interest
  • Capacity to execute on the idea
  • Support (family, friends, partners)

kick it on DotNetKicks.com