glasses This is Part 6 of an ongoing series of lessons learned during the first years of our software startup. Feel free to take a look at our first year (Part 1, Part 2, Part 3) and our second year (Part 4, Part 5). Today we'll talk about one of our failures.

When you run your own company, you never run out of things to learn. We feel we've made great progress learning from our successes but mainly our mistakes. As Bill Gates once said, “It's fine to celebrate success but it is more important to heed the lessons of failure”.

In this line of thought, it is much easier (and faster!) to learn from the failures of other people than your own. It is for this reason that In Search of Stupidity and Founders At Work are on our recommended reading list for anyone launching a software business. We've talked about the books before on this blog, but must mention them again, as they are such a great reads.

Learning from failures is an important part of self-enlightenment but failure, as you can expect, is not something people like to share with others. Therefore, it is hard to find good stories that describe the steps that lead to failure and what could have been done to turn the failure into a success story. In this spirit, I feel it is important to describe one of LavaBlast's failures. I hope that this will encourage those of you who also run startups to post about your own failures, so that we can collectively learn from our experiences.

Even though we build software for the franchise industry, we cultivate a love-hate relationship with it. We decided to launch a business that focuses on franchises for many reasons; one of them being we fill a need in the market. Simply put, we build operational software: our clients need our software to run their business. Amongst the other software companies that build software for the franchise industry, many of them focus on converting web visitors into franchisees, in exchange for a hefty commission. This populates (read pollutes) the Internet with thousands of sites focusing on franchise opportunities. This is something we strongly disliked as it makes it hard to find anything related to franchising on the Internet without landing on one of these websites. (Don't get me wrong... these sites do provide a good service, but make it hard to find anything else.)

Being users of DotNetKicks, a site that aggregates news/articles/blog posts about Microsoft technologies, we thought it would be a good idea to launch a similar site based on the franchise industry. The end result would be a community-driven franchise news site that keeps people informed of what was going on in the franchise world: franchisors going bankrupt, unhappy franchisees, new franchises, franchise trends, franchise humor, etc.

Normally we would have said that this was a crazy project as there was nothing in it for us in exchange for hundreds of hours of programming time. However, DotNetKicks being an open source engine built using the same technologies that we use on a daily basis, we figured it would be easy enough to launch our own engine based on this code. Thus, Franchise NewsBlast was born. In less than a day's work, we had the site up and running and ready to receive content.

We knew we had to create some base content to generate interest and get the ball rolling. We therefore carefully read hundreds of articles and picked the cream of the crop to post on Franchise NewsBlast. We wanted to fill every section EXCEPT for franchise opportunities. Once that was complete, we contacted hundreds of franchise-related websites to inform them about our new engine. We promoted our site to the few bloggers in this space. We wrote a press release and sent it on a few channels. We wrote blog posts on Blue Mau Mau, the largest community-driven franchise website (which we also published here).

To make a long story short, after investing over a hundred hours (most of which in promotion, as the coding had already been done), we had one subscriber. Yes... only one person registered to post and rate articles on Franchise NewsBlast. ONE person joined our free site. This person also runs twelve-or-so franchise related blogs. Obviously, he registered to self-promote and we were happy about this as this is exactly what the site was intended to do... but when there's no community to rate the posts, the site has no value. We never reached the tipping point for it to go viral.

Practice makes perfect. Over the course of the following months, we signed up to various franchise news sources and cross-posted relevant articles. As time passed, we did gain readers but very few posters. We also gained spammers that were obliged to block. We reduced our quality standards in order to keep cross-posting on a regular basis. After three months, the site still stagnated and we discussed the inevitable: shutting the service down.

Three months later, the site was still online as it costs next to nothing to host. However, we're shutting it down today as it hasn't attracted any interest since. We're officially calling this project a failure. Why did it fail? Was it the software? No, the software is great – take a look at the DotNetKicks website. Was it lack of marketing? I don't think so. We did invest tons of time initially to make this work as we wanted this to be our gift to the franchise community.

Before starting this project, we did not know if the community would be interested in this online service. We thought it was a risky project, but were willing to lose a few hours to promoting our altruistic gesture. In the end, we believe there are simply not enough people that are interested in this type of service. If this is not the case, then these people are simply not computer savvy enough to see the value in such a service and/or find us. The last possibility is that we didn't promote it to enough people, even if we gave it our all. (Of course, we never paid a dime for advertising which might have helped us reach the tipping point.)

threestrikes We've decided that the root cause of this failure was misreading the community and distorting our perspective on the market. We looked at the franchise market from a software engineering perspective: a classic mistake made by developers. This is exactly the reason why most software is unusable: developers don't spend enough time thinking like people or getting feedback from users.

Since we launched Franchise NewsBlast, an online franchise communities called FranMarket was launched using the Ning social network generator. Franchise Market Magazine is the originator of this community and we are happy to see they've started building the online franchise community. They've got more users, but our blog has more traffic than they do, according to Alexa. Franchise Brief is probably the simplest yet most active franchise new aggregator we've found but it doesn't appear to have lots of visitors.  Blue Mau Mau is still the biggest player in the online franchise community, and it is the online community for Franchise mavens.

Why are online communities failing in the franchise world? There are many reasons, but we can't claim to know them all. The franchise world is composed of franchisors, franchisees, franchise prospects, and franchise service providers.

  • Franchisors: There aren't that many around. They're not the bulk of the community.
  • Franchisees: There are more franchisees and we can see them being very vocal about the issues they have with their franchisor on sites like Blue Mau Mau. However, most of them are probably too busy running their business to be spending time learning about events in other franchise systems. (And they have better sources than public websites for news about their own franchise.)
  • Franchise prospects: Prospects are the largest part of the community. They are interested in hearing everyone gossip about a franchise they're thinking of buying when doing their due diligence. However, once they do buy, they're probably don't care about what's going on in the franchise world anymore (as they are now franchisees).
  • Franchise service providers: There are lots of such consultants/firms, but as you can imagine the goal is to sell services to others. It's the equivalent to putting a hundred lawyers in the same room as six startup founders. The service providers are not generating the news and hence are not usually that interesting (there are some exceptions – Michael Webster). Service providers like LavaBlast are part of a healthy community, but we're not what defines it.

What's left? Not that many people: and the cream of the crop is already using other services such as Blue Mau Mau. We ignored the classic “know your market” recommendation. We feel that's why we failed. We are disappointed but we don't regret trying out Franchise NewsBlast. After all, we did learn more about the franchise world and we did make a few contacts. Best of all, it gave us a story to write!

Now that we've told you about our failure, we would truly appreciate it if you did the same! Think about your recent failures and blog about them! Everyone fails once in a while! There's no shame in failure as if you never try anything, you'll never go anywhere!

kick it on DotNetKicks.com