The many steps of launching a business... This is Part 7 of an ongoing series of lessons learned during the first years of our software startup. Feel free to take a look at our first year (Part 1, Part 2, Part 3) and our second year (Part 4, Part 5, Part 6). Today we'll talk about of the key lessons that we learned in university that helped us during the first two years of our business: versatility.

We recently presented to a class of computer science students at the University of Ottawa where we spoke of the single most important thing I learned in university: the importance of versatility. To make a long story short, we strongly feel that the more versatile you are, the more valuable you are to a software startup. Small startups don't always have the luxury of assigning roles to each employee (quality assurance manager, database administrator, usability expert, website maintenance, etc.) because of the team size. The founding team is responsible for all of the aspects of the business and they must face fresh challenges every day. The wider the breadth of experience, the better the team can propose cost-effective solutions to their customers. Today's software engineer must be aware of the tools at their disposal, whether they be open source or not. In a sense, this is where a founding team with complementary skills and experience is almost mandatory.

University courses usually introduce subjects that self-learners wouldn't necessarily discover on their own. Although one might not directly apply the theory learned in courses, individuals grow their knowledge base which might eventually help them solve problems efficiently. As an example, data structure and algorithm course gives students the knowledge required to know when to use a hash table or merge sort, even if in practice (almost) no one implements min-max heaps on a daily basis. You probably won't be opening your probability charts for a Gaussian distribution this month, but the lessons learned do help you solve problems such as “which point of sale does an abnormal number of refunds” efficiently. University is all about gathering tools to be able to face all the problems you will encounter in your career.

Furthermore, most new grads grasp the importance of software in a software business. However, lots of people forget about the business aspects. When launching your own startup, you need to have some basic business experience: accounting, marketing, sales, legal, etc. If you've never done your own income tax or budget before and don't know much about software intellectual property, you'll eventually run into problems. In a small software startup, every dollar counts and you want those high-paid experts to do what they're suppose to: solve you hard problems. You don't want to be paying them 200+ dollars an hour to do data entry, but that's what will happen if you don't have a basic understanding of accounting.

In addition, we feel that all computer scientists should have basic knowledge about the various open source software licenses out there, even if they aren't working on open source projects. Why? Simply put, your goal as a software engineer is to avoid reinventing the wheel and write the least amount of new code (less code means less time writing it, less time testing it, less time supporting it). When solutions already exist and can be found on blogs or other sources, it is very tempting to re-use it. However, depending on the software license, bringing this code into your project can have significantly different consequences. Some licenses mean “do what you want with it, but don't sue me if it doesn't work” while others mean “if you import these fifty lines of code into your project, your project becomes open source and you must give a copy to anyone that requests it”. There are tons of nuances, but it doesn't take long to get up to speed. Although we learned this in Dwight Deugo's excellent course, anyone can get up to speed with a few hours of googling.

We use RescueTime One area we haven't mentioned yet is communication / social interactions. We track our time using RescueTime and, over the past 12 months, we can confirm than more than a third of our day is spent on communications. Not only do we collaborate within the team (project planning, testing, managing, etc.) but we also need to maintain relationships with outside parties (clients, prospects, suppliers, etc.). I think the simple fact that we're spending a third of our time talking/writing is justification enough to force ourselves to improve our communication skills. We're definitely not English majors, but we know how to express ideas in simple way that facilitates communication.

In summary, if you want to launch your own software startup after university:

  • Take some business courses
  • Take some law courses
  • Try to improve your writing skills (reports, blog, etc.)
  • Improve your communication skills (oral presentations)
  • Try to avoid student loans!
  • Get as much work experience as possible (coop terms, summer internships)
  • Do more than what is expected of you

 

Passion is the key to success

We've explained how versatility is important, but we should mention that passion is required. We feel it is critical than we tackle any work with the same passion that drives us when developing software. That means balancing bank account statements at 10PM on a Sunday night with passion, if needed. That means attentively reading a 20 page legal document, on a Friday afternoon when required. That means writing a quote with enthusiasm even if the last three failed and someone stole your car stereo last night.

We never feel thrilled to do accounting, but once started, it is important we make the best of it and focus on the task at hand with as much passion as possible. Unfortunately, motivation needs to be intrinsic and cannot be imposed or learned. Some of us can find passion in certain tasks more easily than others, but it is possible to get the same thrill of getting things done regardless of how boring the task is in appearance. Programmers know the importance of getting “in the zone” where productivity is at its maximum. This “zone” is not exclusive to programmers or writers: it can be reached during any task. We're not psychologists in any way, but it does appear that constant observation of how a task is supposedly boring doesn't help productivity. Self-awareness and re-evaluating how a task is executed is definitely a good way to find process improvements, but it shouldn't get in the way of getting things done. Convincing yourself that a task needs to be done, done well, and done efficiently is the first step to getting “in the zone”. Stop thinking about the pain and, eventually, it will go away. Passion improves throughput. Passion improves quality. Passion helps you get back to software development sooner (or whatever you like doing).

While we're on the subject, we've heard another rule of thumb: success is one third hard work, one third contacts, and one third luck. Assuming you've got passion, you've got the hard work area covered. Assuming you've got passion, you'll be able to inspire other people and build a network of contacts. It's going to be harder, but you can do it. Finally, assuming you've got passion, you'll make your own luck. This is probably the hardest fact to accept in business: regardless of you/your team/your idea/your contacts, business is not an exact science. You can improve your chances, but nothing is guaranteed.

This concludes the lessons learned in our second year. I would not be surprised if we added more lessons in twelve months, as we never stop learning new things! If you're thinking of taking the plunge, you should as it is definitely worth it!

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